3. Kompanie Reichsgrenadier Regiment "Hoch- und Deutschmeister"
Reichsgrenadier Division "Hoch- und Deutschmeister"
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Early History
The Great War & the Inter-war years
The Polish Campaign 1939
The French Campaign 1940
The 1st Russian Campaign 1941/42
The 2nd Russian Campaign & the Division's destruction at Stalingrad 1942/43
Formation of the Reichsgrenadier Division
South Tyrol & Istria 1943
The Italian Campaign 1943/44
Hungarian Campaign late 1944 to the end in Austria 1945
Post War History
South Tyrol & Istria 1943


After the division had assembled in the Innsbruck area, OKH ordered the formation of a Kampfgruppe under command of General der Gebirgstruppen Feuerstein. This battlegroup consisted of elements of the Reichsgrenadier Division “Hoch- und Deutschmeister”, Gebirgsjäger Schule Mittenwald, nine Tiger Tanks and a Flak battalion and they were tasked with keeping the Brenner Pass open for the German Army. On the 1 August 1943 "Marschgrüppe Boelke" (Kdr R Gren Rgt HuD), made up of parts of Grenadier Regiment 132, Reichsgrenadier Regiment “Hoch- und Deutschmeister” and 1/Panzerjäger Abteilung 46 marched on the Brenner Pass.

Officers & men of 5. and 6. Kp RGrenRgt HuD crossing the border at the Brenner Pass into Italy, 1 August 1943.
(Officers & men of 5. and 6. Kp RGrenRgt HuD crossing the border at the Brenner Pass into Italy, 1 August 1943).

This was followed by "Marschgrüppe Harrer" (Kdr 2/Artillerie Regiment 96), containing the rest of Grenadier Regiment 132. The remaining parts of the Division were moved by rail to the Bolzano area.


Movement through Italy was only achieved after vigorous negotiations with the Italian authorities. The security area for the division now extended from the Brenner right to Trient. The troops, either billeted in towns or camping in the field, were warmly welcomed and well treated by the people of South Tyrol which was former Austrian territory annexed by the Italians in 1919.


The time spent in South Tyrol was utilised to catch up on outstanding tasks and to conduct further training. Because of the warmer climate the troops were issued with Tropical uniforms. The smallest pleasures in the lives of the Landser’s were not neglected. At the same time the Italian High Command's elite troops relocated to the South Tyrol region, the camaraderie with the Italians was good at this time. All this was changed with the capitulation of Italy on the 8 September 1943. German High Command had already prepared for this situation and instantly put into action the necessary countermeasures to disarm the Italian Armed Forces (Fall Achse). Within the area of the Reichsgrenadier Division disarmament began throughout the night of 8-9 September 1943 with the issue of the codeword “Rosenmontag”, although on occasions the Italians offered fierce resistance. The Division disarmed the XXV & XXXV Italian Army Corps, taking into custody 18 Generals, 1783 Officers and over 50,000 NCO’s and enlisted men and also acquired a large booty of war material.



After the disarmament of the Italian Forces, the division conducted a foot march to Verona. From there, either by truck or by rail transport, 1/Artillerie Regiment 96 and reinforced Grenadier Regiment 131 was transported to Venice to conduct coastal security duties with the remainder of the division transported to the area of Gorizia-Laibach were they were assigned anti-partisan duties. The troops assigned this duty had to scour the areas both to the north and south to systematically destroy the various Italian, Croatian and Slovenian partisan units. Moving through the rough terrain was extremely difficult for the troops and the partisans were extremely elusive and the steep, narrow, hilly and winding roads put huge demands on the Division's truck drivers, the mule columns and the horse drawn vehicles. With the partisan threat finally eliminated in November 1943 the division moved into quarters in Ljubljana.

The Allied landing in Sicily on the 10 July 1943 and further landings on the Italian mainland at Taranto and Salerno in September meant that the division was needed urgently elsewhere and therefore preparations were made to transfer the division south.
 

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Group Members
The Real Reichsgrenadier Division
Organisation & WW2 Service
Colours & Traditions
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Events Calendar
Sister Unit - Kampfgruppe Zoltay
Links